Telling Yarns

  • Getting Sustainable in Your Closet

    I’m sure you’ve felt the difference, holding a handmade gift in your hands. One of my favorites is a necklace, a simple wooden ring, hand carved by a friend. I’m sure hundreds of similar designs exist, but knowing this was made by hand over the course of days specifically for me changes everything.  I don’t believe that fast fashion is the most beautiful world we can create.  There is a growing push towards slow fashion, in which garments are made from natural and non-toxic materials, in safe and healthy working conditions where workers have fair wages and use construction methods that last. Rather than meeting the latest trend, slow fashion pieces are designed to be classic and timeless.  Here a few ideas to consider:

  • The Khadi Cloth

    This quotation comes from J. C. Kumarappa in Why the Village Movement?, and it is in regular rotation here at Joining Yarns. Even if you’ve seen it...
  • Peruvian Highland Wool!

    Fall is coming, and with it some warmer hats! One new yarn coming this fall is The Petite Wool from We Are Knitters, and I’m excited to share what makes it a sustainable and perfect-for-autumn choice!⁠
  • What is OEKO-TEX Certification?

    Because we live in a web of interbeing, making sustainable choices gets complicated.  It's a matter of knowing one's values, recognizing that limited choices that mean compromising on those values, choosing the best out of no good options, and being aware of how one choice can affect much more than one thing.  It's tricky and overwhelming.  While we can't always make the perfect choice that results in perfect sustainability, there are guidelines we can use to make better choices.  One of those guidelines that can help is checking for is OEKO-TEX certification.
  • Why Acrylic Yarn?

    When I was teaching, it was important for me to facilitate a global perspective, recognizing our connectedness beyond our immediate communities. In one such conversation, my class began talking about Toms Shoes and the good they do. I acknowledged the good, and then suggested to my students that we need to think critically about it because of the ways Toms impacts and undercuts local markets in places where they give. One of my students raised his hand and, demonstrating critical thinking, said, "Wait, Bodnar, didn't your old laptop have a Toms sticker on it?" Busted.